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BUTTONWEED Diodia virginiana

The diversity of the wildflower kingdom is minor compared to the diversity of humanity. Every individual is unique although he/she dwells within a family, a community and a culture. The issue we face is learning to live together in an increasingly crowded world that can instantly impact our health and the health of others.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, world population increases about 80 million in 12 months. In only one year it increases more than the total population of Georgia, Florida, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Arkansas combined.

The highest form of worship is the expression of gratitude for God’s creativity, for His love, and His grace that redeems us from sin. Not only did Jesus teach us to love God completely but He commanded us “to love our neighbor as ourselves” (Matthew 22:39).

BUTTONWEED

Diodia virginiana

The buttonweed depicts that important truth, that is, righteousness is both vertical (to God) and horizontal (to our neighbor).

This wildflower is found in shallow ditches, low moist areas on a flat lawn and along the banks of streams. It grows along the ground, often nestled under lawn-grass like Bermuda and Fescue. Sometimes the light pinkish-green stem will rise a few inches and even branch out. As the stem moves laterally the leaves are positioned at right angles in clusters, as illustrated.

Buttonweed flowers have four petals with two stigmas that extend beyond the petals. They are very long compared to the 2/3-inch bloom. Contrary to most wildflowers, there are only two to four stamens and they barely rise above the petals. Thus fertilization depends greatly on wandering insects. The flowers appear where the leaves join the stem. The leaves are generally horizontal and appear in pairs on opposite sides. From these leaf axils the tubular flower rises as pictured in the inset.

The buttonweed’s other distinguishing feature is the seed case that gives the plant its name. Note in the sketch the light green buds where the blooms used to be. These are the seed cases or fruit produced by the plant. These “buttons” are useless except to the survival of the species.

Buttonweed begins blooming in late May and continues until the first frost unless an extended dry spell kills the plant. Finally, it is not known for any medicinal purpose but is a good example of the diversity of the wildflower kingdom.

May we learn to live and act in such a way that peace and harmony will overcome the chaos that divides us here in Georgia, as well as 7.6 billion people in the world.

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Orrin Morris is a retired Baptist minister, local artist and art teacher. To purchase a two-volume set of books featuring his wildflower columns, visit The Sketching Pad in Olde Town Conyers, or call 770-929-3697 or text 404-824-3697. Email him at odmsketchingpad@yahoo.com.

Editor

I have been editor of the Rockdale Citizen since 1996 and editor of the Newton Citizen since it began publication in 2004. I am also currently executive editor of the Clayton News Daily, Henry Daily Herald and Jackson Progress-Argus.

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