• Updated

A handful of brands and retailers are backing the global climate strikes, as a message to government leaders that it's time to do something about the climate crisis.

alertfeatured
  • Updated

CONYERS - Investigators in the case of the three teens shot and killed by a homeowner on White Oak Court early Monday morning have issued a request for assistance in finding two other people who may have been involved in the incident.

featured
  • Updated

Georgia added 20,800 jobs last month, marking the strongest August in the last 20 years and doubling the number of new jobs created in August 2018. 

featured
  • Updated

Colt, the manufacturer of the AR-15 rifle, has announced it's exiting the consumer rifle market as demand for high-powered, semi-automatic guns wanes.

featured
  • Updated

Newton County commissioners heard from two experts Tuesday as they continue to explore what role the county might play in testing for ethylene oxide emissions from the BD Bard plant in Covington.

Pork processing plants will have fewer federal inspectors, and could have faster line speeds, under a controversial rule the U.S. Department of Agriculture finalized this week.Inspectors reject live animals that look sick, or carcass sections that look suspect. "Under the new rule, just announced, pork companies have a new option," Dan Charles reports for NPR. "They can hire their own people to help out. These company employees would be at each inspection station, weeding out any problematic pig parts before the USDA inspector gives the meat a green light. There will be fewer USDA inspectors in the plant because they won't have as much to do."The new rule also eliminates limits on slaughter line speeds. Critics worry that will injure more workers, but industry representatives say it won't. Casey Gallimore, director of regulatory and scientific affairs at the North American Meat Institute, a lobbying group, "says that the new rules will allow plants to try out new ways of operating that could be more efficient," Charles reports. "She says it won't affect food safety. The additional company employees will be highly trained, and USDA inspectors still will look at every piece of pork that goes into the food supply."Critics say company employees aren't required to have extra inspection training, and worry they won't be as aggressive as USDA inspectors in looking for problems. Patty Lovera, an industry critic with the nonprofit Food and Water Watch, told Charles that "to ask company employees to be under that pressure, of pulling product out and costing their employer money, is a lot to ask."The new rules will go into effect in two months, and pork processors have several months to decide whether to switch to the new inspection system, Charles reports.

  • Updated

New England Patriots wide receiver Antonio Brown no longer has an endorsement deal with Nike, the company said Thursday, more than a week after the NFL player was accused of rape.

BLOOMINGTON, Ill. — The Illinois Soybean Association Board of Directors recently approved its fiscal year 2020 budget. This includes checkoff-funded projects targeted at increasing farmer profitability and building customer demand across domestic and international food, feed and fuel markets.

  • Updated

A FedEx pilot was recently detained by Chinese authorities in Guangzhou, a city in southern mainland China. It's the latest in an escalating conflict between the shipping company and the Chinese government.

  • Updated

Negotiators for the United Auto Workers union and General Motors returned to the table Thursday morning, as rank and file workers from the automaker's manned picket lines for a fourth day.

  • Updated

The Federal Reserve cut rates again Wednesday. More rate cuts might be on the way later this year -- and perhaps in 2020. Here's what investors do to adjust to this lower rate world.

  • Updated

Walmart CEO Doug McMillon on Thursday was named the incoming chairman of Business Roundtable, the prominent group of 192 chief executives representing corporate America's interests in Washington.

featured
  • Updated

Roughly 20 miles of milling, plant mix resurfacing and shoulder rehabilitation is planned on State Road 256 beginning at the Colquitt County line and extending to SR 33, and beginning west of U.S. 319/SR 256 and extending to the Worth County line.

  • Updated

We know that mysterious ancient humans called Denisovans once lived alongside Neanderthals, thanks to a few bones and teeth recovered from a cave in Siberia. Now, for the first time, researchers have shared what they might have looked like.

featured
  • Updated

President Donald Trump is suing his long-time accounting firm Mazars USA and New York district attorney Cyrus Vance to attempt to stop his accounting records and tax returns from being sent to the local prosecutor, arguing he can't be prosecuted while in the White House.

We're always interested in hearing about news in our community. Let us know what's going on!

Newspaper Ads

Online Poll

Fans choice voting

You voted: